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Tararua Tramping Club

Celebrating 100 years of tramping

Tararua History Wainuiomata Place Name Origins

Compiled by Jeremy Foster -> mailto:jjfoster [snail] xtra [period] co [period] nz, August 2019.

Revised: 24 August 2021.

The information is laid out in the following style:

Locality Name for example – Baring Head.
Type of geographical feature for example – Headland.
Definition for example – Francis Baring (1800 – 1868) was a supporter of the NZ Company.
He was also a member of parliament in England and a banker. It is also known as Ōrua–pouanui.
Source of the information for example – Map.
Meaning of the information for example – Wikipedia.
Time frame when the name came into existence for example – 1840s.

The origin of the names of various topographical features, tracks, huts and other sites of Wainuiomata. It excludes road and street names, and central Wainuiomata areas on the flat area such as Parks, Houses, Halls etc.

Wainuiomata means big water or stream of Mata. Wai means water. Nui means big. O means of. Mata refers to a woman's name Roimata. This is an official version. The origins of the word are disputed and other translations are:

  • Refers to the women living in the now Hutt Valley who came over the Wainuiomata Hill to evade marauding tribes. These tribes in about 1819 were carrying muskets that came north from the Paremata area. In the battle the local tribes were said to have been destroyed. The Paremata Māoris came across the remaining women who were sitting wailing by the stream after the slaughter of their menfolk. From this we have “faces streaming with water”, “tears” or “weeping water”.
  • Refers to the large pools of water which lay over the swampy surface of the northern end of the Valley, or the river itself which is known to flood the Coast Road / Wainuiomata valley. From this it can also mean large river from the swamp.
  • Refers to a runaway called Mata who was pursued into the Wairarapa by a small party, some of who were killed by the Wairarapa local Māori tribe.
  • Refers to the whitebait that are present at the mouth of the river. Mata means whitebait. From this we have big river of whitebait.
  • Refers to flint or obsidian which is hard rock found in the headwaters of the river.
  • Refers to the origin and personification of water.

The area for the purposes of this document covers is from the head of the Wainuiomata River to the mouth where it enters the sea at the Wainuiomata Coast. Also its tributaries. It covers the east and west side of the river. That is the complete watershed of the river.

Other documents that relate to the area are:

  • For information on high points on the Ōrongorongo side of the Wainuiomata River watershed area see Ōrongorongo Place Name Origins.
  • For information on the eastern side of Wainuiomata from Baring Head to Stokes Valley area see Eastern Hutt Place Name Origins. This includes Pencarrow Head, Gollans Valley and parts of Eastbourne.

See also the Wikipedia page on Wainuiomata.

This document excludes the following:

For more history about the Māori naming and their association with Wainuiomata see the article titled Wainuiomata – Whats in the Name in the book Tales From Wainuiomata's Past – Volume 2 by Gavin Wallace and Dawn Chambers.

The Map sources are from various topographical maps as stated in the Bibliography.

See the Bibliography for further sources of information.

Baring Head / Ōrua–Pouanui Headland
Francis Baring (1800 – 1868) was a supporter of the New Zealand Company. He was also a member of parliament in England and a banker. It is also known as Ōrua–Pouanui. The Greater Wellington Regional Council owns the park and the area covered is about 295 hectares. They have owned the park since 2011. There is a light house and related structures located at Baring Head.

Source – Map. Information – Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1840s.

Beadmore, The Ridge
The origin of this name is not known. It is now known as Catchpool Ridge / Spur.

Source – Wainuiomata Glimpses Of Our Past by Vicky Alexander and Colleen Hira. Information – ?? Time Frame – 1900s.

Bivvy / Bivy Track Track
Where is there is a small temporary shelter. The track starts from the Scholes Creek Track at Camp Wainui along the Coast Road and goes to the Crowther Ridge Track.

Source – Map, Camp Wainui Map. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1960s.

Black Creek / Stream Stream
Where the stream is black from the vegetation / swamp that used to be located from the head of the main Wainuiomata valley, alongside what is now the Fitzherbert Road prior to it being drained in the 1880s. It was also known as Black River.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1840s.

Bridle Track Track
It is a path or trail or thoroughfare that is used by people riding or leading horses. The track starts from about 1201 Coast Road and goes up to Cattle Ridge.

Source – Map, A Guide To The Rimutaka Forest by Bill Sewell. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1900s.

Broad Gully Track Track
Geographical term in that the gully is wide. The track starts from one of the gullies alongside the Wainuiomata Hill Road on the Wainuiomata side and goes to the Main Ridge Track.

Source – Map, Wainuiomata Hillroad Reserve Brochure. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1960s.

Bruces Track Track
Bruce Timothy Coupland (1949 – present) was awarded the Queens Badge in 1967 which is the highest award that can be gained by a member of the Boys Brigade organisation. The track starts from the Gratton Hut at Camp Wainui along the Coast Road and goes to the Sunny Grove Firebreak area.

Source – Map, Camp Wainui Map. Information – Newspaper Article. Time Frame – 1960s.

Burdans Track Track
The Burdans was a farming family that lived in various properties along the Coast Road from the 19th century onwards. They were also farmers in the Gollans Valley area from 1915 to 1963. The track starts from somewhat north from the opposite of the mouth of the Catchpool Stream that goes into the Wainuiomata River, and goes to the southern part of Gollans Valley where the wetland area is.

Source – Map,Wainuiomata Valley Discovery Trail by Vicky Alexander. Information – Land Barons Of Wainuiomata by Gavin Wallace. Time Frame – 1880s.

Butcher Track Track
James William Butcher (1889 – 1949) was a tramper in the Ōrongorongos in the 1920s. He was also the Government Statistician from 1932 to 1946. The track starts from the Ōrongorongo Track at the Catchpool Valley Road Carpark end and goes to Cattle Ridge.

Source – Map. Information – Built Heritage Of The Orongorongo Valley by Chris Cochran, Chris McLean, Allan Sheppard. Time Frame – 1920s.

Camp Ridge Track Track
It overlooks the Camp Wainui area. The track starts from Camp Wainui along the Coast Road and goes to the Round Ridge Track.

Source – Camp Wainui Map. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1960s.

Catchpool Campsite Campsite
Catchpool Ridge / Spur Ridge
Catchpool Stream Water
Catchpool Loop Track Track
Edward Catchpole (1805 – 1874) was a 19th century settler along the Coast Road. It was spelt as Catchpole which is a misspelling of the word Catchpool. The Catchpool Loop Track open in the 1980s. The Catchpool Loop Track starts from the Catchpool Valley Road Carpark end and joins the Ōrongorongo Track.

Source – Map. Information – Built Heritage Of The Orongorongo Valley by Chris Cochran, Chris McLean, Allan Sheppard. Time Frame - 1920s

Champagne Creek Water
It is a white sparkling wine from the Champagne area, France. It was probably named as the water was pure. It was renamed to McKerrow Stream in 1944.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1900s.

Clay Forks Geographic Feature
Clay Ridge Track Track
A thick heavy soil that is soft when wet is prevalent in the area. The track starts from the intersection of Five Mile Loop Track and Middle Ridge Track and goes to Mt McKerrow.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1900s.

Crowthers Creek Water
John Eric Crowther (1831 – 1911) was a 19th century settler in Moores Valley.

Source – Map. Information – Land Barons Of Wainuiomata by Gavin Wallace. Time Frame – 1860s.

Crowther, Mt High Point
Crowther Ridge Track Track
Frederick Kershaw Crowther (1833 – 1907) was a 19th century settler in the Homedale / Coast Road area. The track was there from the 1930s while Mt Crowther was named in the 1860s. There is a transmitter station located near Mt Crowther. The Crowther Ridge Track starts from the Sunny Grove Firebreak area and goes to the McKerrow Track. Prior to the Sunny Grove Firebreak being constructed in the 1960s, the track started from the intersection of the Main Road and Coast Road and went to the McKerrow Track.

Source – Map. Information – Land Barons Of Wainuiomata by Gavin Wallace. Time Frame – 1860s.

Devine, Mt High Point
Thomas John Devine (1851 – 1933) was a 19th century settler in Whitemans Valley. He also worked for the Fitzherberts at their flax mill in Wainuiomata.

Source – Map. Information – Wainuiomata Historical Museum Society Notes. Time Frame – 1880s.

Dicks, Mt High Point
Dicks Spur High Point
David Dick (1817 – 1900) was a 19th century settler in the Homedale area.

Source – Map. Information – Tales From The Swamp by Vicky Alexander. Time Frame – 1882.

Dilemma Hill High Point
In which a difficult choice has to be made between two or more alternatives going downhill.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1880s.

Drummond, Mt High Point
Drummond Ridge Ridge
Thomas Mckay Drummond (1846 – 1934) was a surveyor. It is not named after Halswell David or David Halswell Drummond (1874 – 1942) who was a maintenance person at the Wainuiomata Reservoir, as this name appears on the map around the time to him being born.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1880s.

ECNZ Power Pylon Road Track
The Electricity Corporation of New Zealand (ECNZ) developed the grid transmission line that runs along the various ridges between the Hutt Valley and Wainuiomata. It was known as the New Zealand Electricity Department (NZED) Road. It was also known as the Ridge Top Track. The track starts from the top of the Wainuiomata Hill and goes to Silverstream. Part of the road between Wainuiomata and Naenae, Hutt Valley was bull dozed in the late 1950s. In other areas the road was constructed in the 1960s.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1960s.

EM Peak High Point
Easy Medium (EM) where it is not a hard or steep peak to get to. It is an outdoors term.

Source – Map, Trailforks. Information – Inernet Search. Time Frame – 2000s.

Evans Track Track
Evan Rhys Lewis (1929 – 2013) was a Methodist minister in the Taita Union Parish from 1958 to 1962. He was associated with the Boys Brigade movement. The track starts from the Scholes Creek Track at Camp Wainui along the Coast Road and goes to the Round Ridge Track.

Source – Map, Camp Wainui Map. Information – Methodism In Wellington: 1839 to 1989. Time Frame – 1960s.

Fern Gully Track Track
The area has many ferns which are feathery or leafy fronds. The track starts from between 19 and 21 Gardiner Grove and goes to the Rātā Ridge Track.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1980s.

Fitzherbert, Mt High Point
William Fitzherbert (1810 – 1891) was a member of parliament who represented the Hutt electorate in the 19th century. He also owned substantial areas of land in Wainuiomata in what is now Fitzherbert Road to Upper Fitzherbert Road area. There is a transmitter station located at Mt Fitzherbert.

Source – Map. Information – Tales From The Swamp by Vicky Alexander, Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1840s.

Five Mile Loop Track Track
The track was 5 miles long from where it started at about 925 Coast Road and went to the Ōrongorongo River. It was replaced by the Ōrongorongo Track in 1981. The track starts from the Catchpool Valley Road Carpark and goes to Clay Forks to where it meets the Ōrongorongo Track. It is now only about 3.8 km long.

Source – Map. Information – Built Heritage Of The Orongorongo Valley by Chris Cochran, Chris McLean, Allan Sheppard. Time Frame – 1882.

Five Mile Track Track
The track was 5 miles long from where it started at about 925 Coast Road and went to the mouth of Turere Stream, Ōrongorongo River. It was partially cut by James Daniel Climie (1850 – 1928) in 1882 and later extended to Ōrongorongo River by 1914. It was replaced by the Ōrongorongo Track in 1981. The track that is in the Catchpool Valley has its origins that it was also a Māori Track.

Source – Map. Information – Built Heritage Of The Orongorongo Valley by Chris Cochran, Chris McLean, Allan Sheppard. Time Frame – 1882.

George, Mt High Point
George Hart (1820 – 1895) was a 19th century settler along the Coast Road. It is also known as Mt Puketea.

Source – Map. Information – Electoral Roll. Time Frame – 1882.

George Creek / Stream Water
It was named after either George Wood (1837 – 1884) or George Farrow Wood (1884 – 1952) who were 19th century settlers in Wainuiomata. There is a water intake in the creek which is part of the Wainuiomata water intake scheme.

Source – Map. Information – The Woods Of Woodlands – Wainuiomata by Vicky Alexander. Time Frame – 1860s.

Governors Gate High Point
It was named after George Gray (1812 - 1888) who was a soldier, explorer, colonial governor, premier, and scholar. He at one time owned land at Wainuiomata. He resided at the Governors residence in Lowry Bay and used to fish in the Wainuiomata River in the 1860s. The gate refers to the pass at the top of the Wainuiomata Hill which was removed by roadworks in the 1950s. The area has also been known as The Knoll, Lookout and Summit.

Source – Wainuiomata School Centennial Jubilee 1857 – 1957 by E. G. Anderson and W. Tyler. Information - Internet Search. Time Frame – 1860s.

Graces Hill High Point
Grace, Mt High Point
Graces Stream Water
Graces Stream Campsite Campsite
Graces Track Track
John Charles Grace (1807 – 1886) was a 19th century settler along the Coast Road. Graces Track started from the north part of what is now Jacksons Farm at 726 / 728 Coast Road, and went to where the houses are located at Gollans Valley. Graces Track was later known as Jacksons Track.

Source – Map. Information – Land Barons Of Wainuiomata by Gavin Wallace. Time Frame – 1850s.

Grassy, Mt High Point
Grassy Spur High Point
An area that is covered in grass.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1882.

Green Gully Stream Water
Geographical term in that the gully is green. Located along the Gum Tree Track.

Source – Map, Wainuiomata Waterworks Recreation Area Brochure. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1970s.

Green Gully Track Track
Geographical term in that the gully is green. The track starts from one of the gullies alongside the Wainuiomata Hill Road on the Wainuiomata side and goes to the Main Ridge Track.

Source – Map, Wainuiomata Hillroad Reserve Brochure. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1900s.

Gutbuster Track Track
A track where people had to stop and take a rest as it was steep. It was a steep track that started from about 925 Coast Road and went over the ridge to a area to an area north of where the road ends in the Catchpool Valley. It was in existence from the 1900s to 1970. When the road was put through the Catchpool Valley in 1970 the track ceased to be used. It was also the start / finish of the Five Mile Track.

Source – Map. Information – Built Heritage Of The Orongorongo Valley by Chris Cochran, Chris McLean, Allan Sheppard. Time Frame – 1900s.

Harvard / Haarvard Track Track
Harvard University is situated in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America. It is also a name of plane which was a single engined advanced trainer. The track starts from about a quarter way along the Ōrongorongo Track from the Ōrongorongo River end and goes up the ridge to the McKerrow Track.

Source – Tararua Tramping Club Trip Reports. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 2000s.

Hut Track Track
There is a private managers hut in the area. The track starts from the Scholes Creek Track at Camp Wainui along the Coast Road and goes to the Round Ridge Track.

Source – Map, Camp Wainui Map. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1960s.

Impossible Ridge Track Track
It was thought that it was not possible for a track to go along the ridge. The track starts from the Gratton Hut area at Camp Wainui along the Coast Road and goes to Mt Crowther.

Source – Map, Camp Wainui Map. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1960s.

Jackson Track Track
Charles Welby Jackson (1840 – 1926) was a 19th century settler in Wainuiomata. He married Elizabeth Grace (1842 – 1926) whose father and family originally developed this area along the Coast Road. The track started from the north part of Jacksons Farm at 726 / 728 Coast Road, and went to where the houses are located at Gollans Valley. It was used by trampers from the 1890s to 1963 who used to walk from Eastbourne through Gollans Valley to gain access to the Ōrongorongo River area. The area now has power poles that goes along part of the track. The track was also known as the Graces Track.

Source – Map,Wainuiomata Valley Discovery Trail by Vicky Alexander. Information – Land Barons Of Wainuiomata by Gavin Wallace. Time Frame – 1880s.

John Woods Creek Water
John Wood (1830 – 1866) was a 19th century settler in Wainuiomata in the Moores Valley Road area.

Source – Map. Information – The Woods Of Woodlands – Wainuiomata by ''Vicky ALexander'. Time Frame – 186s.

Karaka Stream Water
A native tree with glossy leaves and orange berries.

Source – Map. Information – Eastbourne: A History Of The Eastern Bays by Ann Beaglehole. Time Frame – 1800s.

Ken, Mt High Point
Kenneth (Ken) Donald Thomson (1899 – 1978) was a son of Spensley Dixon Thomson (1864 – 1936) of Kamahi Farm of Stokes Valley. The farm was subdivided into housing from the 1920s by Spensley.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Search and Papers Past. Time Frame – 1943.

Kōnini Firebreak Track
A fruit of the native fuchsia, kotukutuku. The firebreak starts from 11 Brian Morgan Terrace and goes to the ECNZ Power Pylon Road. The track originally started from between 6 and 8 Kōnini Street, but urban development towards the foot of the hill where the Kōnini / Parkway Reservoir has meant that there is now closer access. The track originally went to the water reservoir which was built in 1961. In the early 1970s it was extended to the ECNZ Power Pylon Road. There are some tracks that go down into the Parkway and Arakura areas. The track has its origins in that it was also a Māori Track. It was also one of the tracks into Wainuiomata prior to the Wainuiomata Hill Road being built in the late 1850s.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1960s.

Lees Grove Track Track
Louis Charles Lee (1892 – 1964) was a cheese maker. At one time he was a factory manager of the Mata Cheese Factory in Wainuiomata that was in existence from 1919 to 1929. He later went into partnership and formed Horokiwi Quarries. The track starts from between 72 and 74 Lees Grove and goes to the Rātā Ridge Track / Mt Lowry.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Our Buried History – Coast Road Church, Wainuiomata by Colleen Hira. Time Frame – 1950s.

Long Ridge Ridge
Geographical term in that it is long and narrow. It is located at the intersection of the Wainuiomata River West and East Branch and goes along the ridge to near Mt Devine.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1900s.

Lowry, Mt High Point
Richard Jennings Lowry (1816 – 1840) was a First Mate on the Tory, the New Zealand Company Survey Ship, which anchored in Wellington Harbour in 1839.

Source – Map. Information – Eastbourne: A History Of The Eastern Bays by Ann Beaglehole. Time Frame – 1840s.

Māhoe Track Track
A small broad leafed native tree, sometimes called whitey–wood. The track starts from the Scholes Creek Track at Camp Wainui along the Coast Road and goes to Bruces Track.

Source – Map, Camp Wainui Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1960s.

Main Ridge Track Track
Geographical term in that it is the prominent ridge and that it is long and narrow. It was also known as the Summit / West Ridge Track. The track starts from the top of the Wainuiomata Hill and goes to the intersection of Kererū Track and Hawtrey Track located at Eastbourne. The track has its origins in that it was also a Māori Track.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1960s.

Mānuka Spur Vegetation
A flowering native tree that has aromatic, prickly leaves and many small, white, pink or red flowers. It is now known as Middle Ridge which is located in the Catchpool Valley area.

Source – Wainuiomata Glimpses Of Our Past by Vicky Alexander and Colleen Hira. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Mānuka Track Track
A flowering native tree that has aromatic, prickly leaves and many small, white, pink or red flowers. The track starts from where the Morton Dam is and goes up the Wainuiomata River Valley. It then goes into the Ōrongorongo River Valley to where the water intake area is. It is also known as the Pack Track.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1900s.

McKerrow Stream Water
McKerrow Track Track
James McKerrow (1834 – 1919) was a Surveyor General of New Zealand. McKerrow Stream was also known as Champagne Creek. The McKerrow Track starts from near the Ōrongorongo River entrance of the Ōrongorongo Track and goes to Mt McKerrow and then to the Whakanui Track.

Source – Map. Information – Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1880s.

Middle Ridge Track Track
Geographical term in that it is the middle of a long and narrow nearby series of ridges. The track starts from the Catchpool Valley Road Carpark end and goes to the intersection of the Five Mile Loop and Clay Ridge Tracks. It was once known as the Mānuka Spur Track.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1900s.

Midway Bridge Bridge
The bridge is located in the middle of the Ōrongorongo Track which goes from the Catchpool Valley Road Carpark end to the Ōrongorongo River.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1980s.

Mowlem, Mt High Point
John Mowlem (1840 – 1910) was a 19th century settler in the Moores Valley area.

Source – Map. Information – Land Barons Of Wainuiomata by Gavin Wallace. Time Frame – 1860s.

Munga Munga Stream Water
A native palm, where the fronds of which meet to form a bulbous head and the unbranched trunk has circular leaf scars. It is more commonly known as the nī;kau palm.

Source – Map, Camp Wainui Map. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1950s.

Nīkau Creek Water
A native palm, where the fronds of which meet to form a bulbous head and the unbranched trunk has circular leaf scars.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Ōrua–Pouanui Headland
Of the place of the den or retreat of Pouanui. O means of. Rua means place. Pouanui is a name of a person. It is also known as Baring Head.

Source – Map, The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Time Frame – 1800s.

Pack Track Track
A track that was cut so that supplies could be tracked in. The ttrack starts from where the Morton Dam is and goes up the Wainuiomata River Valley. It then goes into the Ōrongorongo River Valley to where the water intake area is. It is also known as the Manuka Track.

Source – Map, Our Water History On Tap by John Morrison. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1920s.

Para, Mt High Point
A shortened version of the Māori settlement called Parangarahu that existed in Fitzroy Bay until about the 1850s. Parangarahu means the fern baskets. Para means fern. Nga means the. Rahu means basket. There are the remains of a World War 2 (1939 – 1945) Lookout Post located at Mt Para.

Source – Map. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Time Frame – 1800s.

Parks, Mt High Point
Robert Park (1812 – 1870) was a New Zealand Company surveyor and later the government surveyor to the Wellington district. It is located in the vicinity of Mt Grace.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Okiwi – European Occupation of the Eastern Bays, Port Nicholson by A. G. Bagnall. Time Frame – 1882.

Parkway Playground Track Track
A broad landscaped highway thoroughfare. It is also known as the Spoon / Spooners Hill Track. The track starts from 33 Parkway and goes to the ECNZ Power Pylon Road.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1930s.

Plumbago Stream Water
A evergreen flowering shrub or climber plant.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1900s.

Prouses Brow High Point
Prouse, Mt High Point
Richard Prouse (1792 – 1875) was a 19th century settler along the Coast Road.

Source – Map. Information – Land Barons Of Wainuiomata by Gavin Wallace. Time Frame – 1860s.

Pukeatua Bridge High Point
A hill of the god. Puke means hill. Atua means god. The top ridge of the Wainuiomata Hill was once covered in the Rātā tree, when in full bloom made a crown of red on the top of the range.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Place Names Dictionary. Time Frame – 2016.

Puketea, Mt High Point
A tall native tree that has toothed leaves and produces small flowers. It was also known as Mt George.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Place Names Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Pūriri Street Track Track
A large spreading native tree with clusters of red fruit, a popular food of the kererū or the native wood pigeon. The track starts from the bottom of the south side of the Wainuiomata Hill Road and goes to the Main Ridge Track.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1960s.

Rātā Ridge Track Track
A tall native tree with red flowers similar to those of the pōhutukawa. The track starts from Mt Lowry and goes to the south west side of Wainuiomata.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1950s.

Ridge Top Track Track
A long narrow hilltop. It is now known as the ECNZ Power Pylon Road. The track is between Wainuiomata and the Hutt Valley.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1950s.

Round Hill High Point
Round Peak High Point
Geographical term in that it is higher and circular than the surrounding area.

Source – Map''. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1880s.

Round Ridge Track Track
Geographical term in that the ridge is round. The track starts from Camp Wainui along the Coast Road and goes to the Mt McKerrow Track.

Source – Map, A Guide To The Rimutaka Forest by Bill Sewell. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1880s.

Scholes Creek (formerly Scholls Creek) Water
Scholes Creek Track Track
Thomas Scholes (1839 – 1923) was a 19th century settler along the Coast Road. It was changed in 2006 from Scholls Creek which was a misspelling of Scholes. Scholes Creek Track starts from Camp Wainui along the Coast Road and goes to the waterfall which is at the start of the Evans Track.

Source – Map. Information – Our Buried History – Coast Road Church, Wainuiomata by Colleen Hira. Time Frame – 1880s.

Sinclair Creek Water
Hugh or Ewen Sinclair (1810 – 1871) was a 19th century settler in the Whitcher Grove / Reservoir Road / Hine Road area. The family were the owner of a timber mill in the area.

Source – Map. Information – Land Barons Of Wainuiomata by Gavin Wallace. Time Frame – 1860s.

Skerrets Creek Water
Charles Perrin Skerret (1863 – 1929) was a Chief Justice of New Zealand. He was also a keen outdoors person who had a fishing whare in the vicinity of what is now the Hine Road / Willis Grove area. This is thought to be at a house called Riverlea which was previously known as Glenhill located at 136 Hine Road. There was a water intake located in the area north of where the streets ends. This was constructed in 1955 and shut down by the early 1960s. There are still remnants of this in the area.

Source – Map. Information – Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1900s.

Skull Gully Stream Water
Named after animal skulls that were found in the area.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1880s.

Sledge Track Creek Water
Where wooden sledges, pulled by bollocks were used to bring the wood wood to the Sinclairs sawmill located on what is now the corner of Moores Valley Road and Whitcher Grove. It is a historic logging track put in by the Sinclair family who extracted timber in the area between the 1850s and the early 1880s.

Source – Map. Information – Greater Wellington Regional Council. Time Frame – 1870s.

Solomon Track Track
A peaceful area. The track was in existence from the 1900s to the 1960s when it was closed as it was in the Wainuiomata Water Collection area. The track ran along the ridgeline between the Morton Dam and the Whakanui Track to the hill at the top of Nīkau Creek.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1900s.

Spoon / Spooners Hill Track Track
An implement consisting of a small, shallow oval or round bowl on a long handle, used for eating, stirring, and serving food. The area is shaped like a upside down spoon so hence its name. It is also known as the Parkway Playground Track. It was named in the 1920s but it its origins is that it was also a Māori Track. It was also one of the tracks into Wainuiomata prior to the Wainuiomata Hill Road being built in the late 1850s. The track starts from 33 Parkway and goes to the ECNZ Power Pylon Road.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1930s.

Stake, Mt High Point
A strong wooden post driven into the ground to mark at boundary.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1960s.

Stanley Street Track Track
George Stanley Sharp (1887 – 1967) was a bond holder and a director in the Wainuiomata Development Company. The track starts from 52 Stanley Street and goes to the Rātā Ridge Track.

Source – Map. Information – Valley And Bays – Origins Of Street Names In Lower Hutt, Including Eastbourne, Petone And Wainuiomata by Alison Carey. Time Frame – 1950s.

Stroll Track, The Track
To wander or roam from place to place. The track starts from the Gratton Hut at Camp Wainui along the Coast Road and goes along the Munga Munga Stream, and then to Bruces Track.

Source – Map, Camp Wainui Map. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1960s.

Sugarloaf, Mt High Point
A object or structure with a conical shape.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1880s.

Sunny Grove Firebreak Track
Named on a rainy day when Brenda Shirley Willis (1931 – 2014) who was a daughter of the developer / land owner Norman Elias Willis (1901 – 1977), wished that the sun was shining when shown the area. The track starts from 77 Sunny Grove and goes to Mt Crowther. There is also 2 water reservoirs near the start of the track.

Source – Map. Information – Valley And Bays – Origins Of Street Names In Lower Hutt, Including Eastbourne, Petone And Wainuiomata by Alison Carey. Time Frame – 1970s.

Tawa Track Track
A native tree of the laurel family, which bears damson like fruit. The track starts from one of the gullies alongside the Wainuiomata Hill Road on the Wainuiomata side and goes to the Main Ridge Track.

Source – Map, Wainuiomata Hillroad Reserve Brochure. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1950s.

Te Hīkoi Ararewa Track
The pathway to the horizon. Te means the. Hīkoi means pathway. Ararewa means horizon. It is also known as the Wainuiomata Hill Shared Path. It is located on the Wainuiomata side of the Wainuiomata Hill Road.

Source – Map, Newspaper article. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 2018.

Te Raina Pa Settlement
The line. It was a pa site. Te means the. Raina means line. It is located on the road side near the foot of the hills near where the Wainuiomata River meets the sea.

Source – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Time Frame – 1800s.

Thistle Stream Water
A widely distributed herbaceous plant of the daisy family, which typically has a prickly stem and leaves and rounded heads of purple flowers.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1920s.

Tōtara, Mt High Point
A large native tree that has prickly, olive–green leaves not in two rows.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Tōwai, Mt High Point
A medium size evergreen native tree that has long, leathery, dark green leaves having blunt teeth. Flowers white to pale rose. There is a transmitter station located at Mt Tōwai.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Upper Fitzherbert Track Track
William Fitzherbert (1810 – 1891) was a member of parliament who represented the Hutt electorate in the 19th century. He also owned substantial areas of land in Wainuiomata in what is now Fitzherbert Road to the Upper Fitzherbert Road area. The tracks starts from 167 Upper Fitzherbert Road and goes to the ECNZ Power Pylon Road overlooking Naenae in the Hutt Valley.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Wikipedia. Time Frame – 2000s.

Wainui, Mt High Point
AA big water. Wai means water. Nui means big. It overlooks the Wellington harbour. It is also the shorten version of Wainuiomata.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Place Names Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Wainuiomata Personal Name
Wainuiomata Beach Water
Wainuiomata River Water
Wainuiomata River East Branch Water
Wainuiomata River West Branch Water
Wainuiomata Stream Water
Big water or stream of Mata. Wai means water. Nui means big. O means of. Mata refers to a woman's name Roimata. This is an official version. The origins of the word are disputed and other translations are:

  • Refers to the women living in the now Hutt Valley who came over the Wainuiomata Hill to evade marauding tribes. These tribes in about 1819 were carrying muskets that came north from the Paremata area. In the battle the local tribes were said to have been destroyed. The Paremata Māoris came across the remaining women who were sitting wailing by the stream after the slaughter of their menfolk. From this we have “faces streaming with water”, “tears” or “weeping water”.
  • Refers to the large pools of water which lay over the swampy surface of the northern end of the Valley, or the river itself which is known to flood the Coast Road / Wainuiomata valley. From this it can also mean large river from the swamp.
  • Refers to a runaway called Mata who was pursued into the Wairarapa by a small party, some of who were killed by the Wairarapa local Māori tribe.
  • Refers to the whitebait that are present at the mouth of the river. Mata means whitebait. From this we have big river of whitebait.
  • Refers to flint or obsidian which is hard rock found in the headwaters of the river.
  • Refers to the origin and personification of water.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Place Names Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Wainuiomata Iti Stream Water
Small water or stream that feeds into the big water or stream of Mata. See Wainuiomata for the full meaning. Iti means small. Downstream from about where Crowther Road is it becomes the Wainuiomata Stream. It was also known as the Little Wainuiomata Stream and Moores Valley Stream.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Place Names Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Waiwhetū Range High Point
Starry Water. It is now known as the Wainuiomata Hill. Wai means water. Whetū means stars.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Place Names Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Whare Hill High Point
A hut or house. Named after a hut that was located in the area. The hut was in existence from the 1870s to ? It is located in the Mt Grace area.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Willis Grove Track Track
Norman Elias Willis (1901 – 1977) was a dental surgeon in Petone, Hutt Valley. He was also a developer / land owner in Wainuiomata. It is also known as the Kiwanis Lookout Track. The track starts from 16 Willis Grove and goes to Mt Crowther.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Valley And Bays – Origins Of Street Names In Lower Hutt, Including Eastbourne, Petone And Wainuiomata by Alison Carey. Time Frame – 1980s.

Woods Hill High Point
Thomas Woods (1851 – 1938) was a 19th century settler in Wainuiomata. It is located along the Moores Valley Road area.

Source – Map. Information – The Woods Of Woodlands – Wainuiomata by Vicky Alexander. Time Frame – 1880s.

Zigzag Track Track
Geographical term in that the track has alternate right and left turn up and down the hill. The track starts from between 1 and 3 Fraser Street and goes to the Rātā Ridge Track.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1980s.

Bibliography

Maps

  • A Guide To Rimutaka And Haurangi State Forest Parks 274/4 Edition 1 1984.
  • Hutt N160 1943.
  • Hutt N160 3rd Edition 1965.
  • Hutt N160 4th Edition 1977.
  • Lower Hutt BQ32 Edition 1.08 2019.
  • Onoke N165 3rd Edition 1973.
  • Park Map Rimutaka And Haurangi 274–02 Edition 2 1989.
  • Rimutaka N161 1'st Edition 1943.
  • Rimutaka N161 2nd Edition 1968.
  • Rimutaka N161 3rd Edition 1974.
  • Turakirae R28 Edition 1 1978.
  • Wellington BQ31 Edition 2 2016.
  • Wellington N164 2nd Edition 1962.
  • Wellington N164 3rd Edition 1967.
  • Wellington N164 4th Edition 1974.
  • Wellington R27 1st Edition 1979.
  • Wellington R27 and part Q27 2nd Edition 1983.
  • Wellington R27, R28 and part Q27 3rd Edition 1996.
  • Wellington R27, R28 and part Q27 2006.

Surveyor Field Books from Land Information New Zealand.

Other Sources

Birth and Deaths dates have been obtained from:

  • Birth, Death and Marriage Indexes from New Zealand, England and Ireland.
  • Other genealogy sources such as Ancestry and Find My Past.
Other:

Books

  • Adkin, G. Leslie. The Great Harbour of Tara.
  • Alexander, Vicky and Hira, Colleen. Wainuiomata Glimpses Of Our Past.
  • Alexander, Vicky. Mary Crowther of Brookfield.
  • Alexander, Vicky. Tales From The Swamp.
  • Alexander, Vicky. The Woods Of Woodlands – Wainuiomata.
  • Alexander, Vicky. Wainuiomata Valley Discovery Trail.
  • Anderson, E. G. and Tyler, W. Wainuiomata School Centennial Jubilee 1857 – 1957.
  • Beaglehole, Ann. Eastbourne: A History Of The Eastern Bays.
  • Blayney, G. P. Early Education in Wainuiomata.
  • Carey, Alison. Valley And Bays – Origins Of Street Names In Lower Hutt, Including Eastbourne, Petone And Wainuiomata.
  • Cochran, Chris and Maclean, Chris and Sheppard, Allan. Built Heritage of the Orongorongo Valley.
  • Daley, James M. Hutt City Council Centenary 1877 – 1977.
  • Doughty, Catherine M. (compiled) The History of Wainuiomata (Library Pathfinder).
  • Foley, Kristen. Wellington Rock – A Guide for Climbers.
  • Harkness, Mark. Hydrology of the Wainuiomata Catchment.
  • Hira, Colleen. Our Buried History – Coast Road Church, Wainuiomata.
  • Irvine-Smith, F. L. The Streets of My City.
  • Kenneally, J. M. and B. M. Wainuiomata These Passing Years.
  • Kerr, Ross. A Chronology of the Tararua and Rimutaka Ranges – 6th Edition.
  • Lane–Taylor, Joanne. The History of the Orongoronga Valley and Environs.
  • Methodism In Wellington: 1839 to 1989.
  • Morrison, John. Our Water History On Tap.
  • Morrison, Sally. History of Water Supply in the Wellington Region 1872 – 1985.
  • Reed, A. W. A Dictionary of Maori Place Names.
  • Sewell, Bill. A Guide to Rimutaka Forest Park.
  • Wallace, Gavin and Chambers, Dawn. Tales From Wainuiomata's Past Volume 2.
  • Wallace, Gavin. The Land Barons Of Wainuiomata.
  • Wallace, Gavin (compiled). Tales From Wainuiomata's Past.
  • Ward, Alan. Maori Customary Interests in the Port Nicholson District, 1820s to 1840s: An Overview.
Category
Wainuiomata Glossary

Page last modified on 2021 Aug 23 23:51

Edit - History - Recent changes - Wiki help - Search     About TTC     Contact us     About the website     Site map     email page as link -> mailto:?Subject=TTC: Wainuiomata Place Name Origins&Body=From the TTC website: Wainuiomata Place Name Origins (https://ttc [period] org [period] nz/pmwiki/pmwiki [period] php/TararuaHistory/WainuiomataPlaceNameOrigins) The origin of the names of various topographical features of Wainuiomata.