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Tararua Tramping Club

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Tararua History Wainuiomata Place Name Origins

Compiled by Jeremy Foster -> mailto:jjfoster [snail] xtra [period] co [period] nz, August 2019.

Revised: 27 December 2019.
Phone: (04) 586–5807.

The information is laid out in the following style:

Locality Name for example – Baring Head.
Type of geographical feature for example – Headland.
Definition for example – Francis Baring (1800 – 1868) was a supporter of the NZ Company.
He was also a English MP and a banker. It is also known as Orua–pouanui.
Source of the information for example – Map.
Meaning of the information for example – Wikipedia.
Time frame when the name came into existence for example – 1840s.

The origin of the names of various topographical features of Wainuiomata. It excludes street names and central Wainuiomata areas on the flat area such as Parks, Houses, Halls etc. Wainuiomata means big water or stream of Mata. Wai means water. Nui means big. O means of. Mata refers to a woman's name. This is an official version. The origins of the word are disputed and other commonly accepted translations are:

  • Refers to the women who came over the Wainuiomata Hill to evade marauding tribes who were carrying muskets about 1819 from the north, and who sat wailing by the stream after the slaughter of their menfolk. From this we have “faces streaming with water” or “tears”.
  • Refers to the large pools of water which lay over the swampy surface of the northern end of the Valley, or the river itself which is known to flood the Wainuiomata / Coast Road valley. From this it can also mean large river from the swamp.
  • Mata can also mean flint.

The area for the purposes of this document covers is from the head of the Wainuiomata River to the mouth where it enters the sea at the Wainuiomata Coast. Also its tributaries. It covers the east and west side of the river. That is the complete watershed of the river.

Other documents that relate to the area are:

  • For information on high points on the Ōrongorongo side of the Wainuiomata River watershed area see Ōrongorongo Place Name Origins.
  • For information on the eastern side of Wainuiomata from Baring Head to Stokes Valley area see Eastern Hutt Place Name Origins. This includes Pencarrow Head, Gollans Valley and parts of Eastbourne.
  • For information within Wainuiomata central see the Wainuiomata Central Place Names document.

For more history about the Maori naming and their association with Wainuiomata see the article titled Wainuiomata – Whats in the Name in the book Tales From Wainuiomatas Past – Volume 2 by Gavin Wallace and Dawn Chambers.

The Map sources are from various topographical maps as stated in the Bibliography.

See the Bibliography for further sources of information.

Baring Head Headland
Francis Baring (1800 – 1868) was a supporter of the NZ Company. He was also a English MP and a banker. It is also known as Orua–pouanui.

Source – Map. Information – Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1840s.

Beadmore, The Ridge
The origin of this name is not known.

Source – Wainuiomata Glimpses Of Our Past by Vicky Alexander and Colleen Hira. Information – ?? Time Frame – 1900s.

Black Stream Stream
Where the stream is black from the vegetation.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1840s.

Bridle Track Track
To help restrain a horses movements when necessary. It is a path or trail or thoroughfare that is used by people riding on horses.

Source – Map, A Guide To The Rimutaka Forest by Bill Sewell. Information – Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1900s.

Broad Gully Track Track
Geographical term in that the gully is wide.

Source – Wainuiomata Hillroad Reserve Brochure. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1960s.

Burdans Track Track
The Burdans was a farming family that lived in various properties along the Coast Road and Gollans Valley. They were farmers in the Gollans Valley from 1915 to 1963

Source – Wainuiomata Valley Discovery Trail by Vicky Alexander. Information – Land Barons Of Wainuiomata by Gavin Wallace. Time Frame – 1880s.

Butcher Track Track
James William Butcher (1889 – 1949) was a tramper in the Ōrongorongos in the 1920s. He was also the Government Statistician from 1932 to 1946.

Source – Map. Information – Built Heritage Of The Orongorongo Valley by Chris Cochran, Chris McLean, Allan Sheppard. Time Frame – 1920s.

Catchpool Spur Ridge
Catchpool Stream Water
Catchpool Track
Track''
Edwin Catchpole (1805 – 1874) was a 19th century settler along the Coast Road. Catchpool is a misspelling of the word Catchpole.

Source – Map. Information – Built Heritage Of The Orongorongo Valley by Chris Cochran, Chris McLean, Allan Sheppard. Time Frame - 1920s

Champagne Creek Water
It is a white sparkling wine from the Champagne area, France. It was probably named as the water was pure. It was renamed to McKerrow Stream in 1944.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1900s.

Clay Forks Geographic Feature
Clay Ridge Track Track
A thick heavy soil that is soft when wet is prevalent in the area.

Source – Map. Information – Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1900s.

Crowther Creek Water
John Eric Crowther (1831 – 1911) was a 19th century settler in Moores Valley.

Source – Map. Information – Land Barons Of Wainuiomata by Gavin Wallace. Time Frame – 1860s.

Crowther, Mt High Point
Crowther Ridge Track Track
Frederick Kershaw Crowther (1833 – 1907) was a 19th century settler in the Homedale / Coast Road area. The track was there from the 1950s while Mt Crowther was named in the 1860s.

Source – Map, A Guide To The Rimutaka Forest by Bill Sewell. Information – Land Barons Of Wainuiomata by Gavin Wallace. Time Frame – 1860s.

Devine, Mt High Point
Thomas John Devine (1851 – 1933) was a 19th century settler in Whitemans Valley. He also worked for the Fitzherberts at their flax mill in Wainuiomata.

Source – Map. Information – Wainuiomata Historical Museum Society Notes. Time Frame – 1880s.

Dicks, Mt High Point
Dicks Spur High Point
David Dick (1817 – 1900) was a 19th century settler in the Homedale area.

Source – Map. Information – Tales From The Swamp by Vicky Alexander. Time Frame – 1882.

Dilemma Hill High Point
In which a difficult choice has to be made between two or more alternatives going downhill.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1880s.

Drummond, Mt High Point
The origin of this name is not known. It is not named after the Drummond who was a maintenance person as this name appears on the map around the time to him being born.

Source – Map. Information – ?? Time Frame – 1880s.

Drummond Ridge Ridge
Halswell David or David Halswell Drummond (1874 – 1942) lived at the Wainuiomata reservoir. He was a maintenance engineer.

Source – Map. Information – Wainuiomata These Passing Years by J.M. & B.M. Kenneally. Time Frame – 1890s.

ECNZ Track Track
Electricity Corporation of New Zealand developed the grid transmission line that runs along various ridges.

Source – Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1960s.

Fern Gully Track Track
The area has many ferns which are feathery or leafy fronds.

Source – Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1980s.

Fitzherbert, Mt High Point
William Fitzherbert (1810 – 1891) represented the Hutt electorate in the 19th century. He also owned substantial parts of land in Wainuiomata.

Source – Map. Information – Tales From The Swamp by Vicky Alexander. Time Frame – 1840s.

Five Mile Track Track
The track was 5 miles long from the Coast Road to the Ōrongorongo River. It was partially cut by James Daniel Climie (1850 – 1928) in 1882. It has been superseded by the Catchpool Track.

Source – Map. Information – Built Heritage Of The Orongorongo Valley by Chris Cochran, Chris McLean, Allan Sheppard. Time Frame – 1882.

George, Mt High Point
George Hart (1820 – 1895) was a 19th century settler along the Coast Road. It is also known as Mt Puketea.

Source – Map. Information – Electoral Roll. Time Frame – 1882.

George Creek Water
George Wood (1837 – 1884) or George Farrow Wood (1884 – 1952) was a 19th century settler in Wainuiomata.

Source – Map. Information – The Woods Of Woodlands – Wainuiomata by Vicky Alexander. Time Frame – 1860s.

Graces Hill High Point
Grace, Mt High Point
Graces Stream Water
John Charles Grace (1807 – 1886) was a 19th century settler along the Coast Road.

Source – Map. Information – Land Barons Of Wainuiomata by Gavin Wallace. Time Frame – 1850s.

Grassy, Mt High Point
Grassy Spur High Point
An area that is covered in grass.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1882.

Green Gully Stream Water
Geographical term in that the gully is green.

Source – Wainuiomata Waterworks Recreation Area Brochure. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1970s.

Green Gully Track Track
Geographical term in that the gully is green.

Source – Wainuiomata Hillroad Reserve Brochure. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1900s.

Gutbuster Track Track
A track where people had to stop and take a rest as the track was steep. It was a steep track between Coast Road and Catchpool Valley. It was in existence from the 1920s to 1970.

Source – Map. Information – Built Heritage Of The Orongorongo Valley by Chris Cochran, Chris McLean, Allan Sheppard. Time Frame – 1900s.

Jackson Track Track
Charles Welby Jackson (1840 – 1926) was a 19th century settler in Wainuiomata. He married Elizabeth Grace (1842 – 1926) whose father and family originally developed this area along the Coast Road.

Source – Wainuiomata Valley Discovery Trail by Vicky Alexander. Information – Land Barons Of Wainuiomata by Gavin Wallace. Time Frame – 1880s.

Karaka Stream Water
A native tree with glossy leaves and orange berries.

Source – Map. Information – Eastbourne: A History Of The Eastern Bays by Ann Beaglehole. Time Frame – 1800s.

Ken, Mt High Point
The origin of this name is not known.

Source – Map. Information – ?? Time Frame – 1943.

Konini Firebreak Track
A fruit of the native fuchsia, kotukutuku.

Source – Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1960s.

Lees Grove Track Track
Louis Charles Lee (1892 – 1964) was a cheese maker. At one time he was a factory manager of the Mata Cheese Factory in Wainuiomata. He later went into partnership and formed Horokiwi Quarries.

Source – Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Our Buried History – Coast Road Church, Wainuiomata by Colleen Hira. Time Frame – 1950s.

Long Ridge Ridge
Geographical term in that it is long and narrow.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1900s.

Lowry, Mt High Point
Richard Jennings Lowry (1816 – 1840) was a First Mate on the Tory, the New Zealand Company Survey Ship, which anchored in Wellington Harbour in 1839.

Source – Map. Information – Eastbourne: A History Of The Eastern Bays by Ann Beaglehole. Time Frame – 1840s.

Main Ridge Track Track
Geographical term in that it is the prominent ridge and that it is long and narrow.

Source – Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1960s.

Manuka Spur Vegetation
A flowering native tree that has aromatic, prickly leaves and many small, white, pink or red flowers.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Manuka Track Track
A flowering native tree that has aromatic, prickly leaves and many small, white, pink or red flowers. Located at Reservoir / Sinclair / Waterworks Valley.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

McKerrow Stream Water
McKerrow Track Track
James McKerrow (1834 – 1919) was a Surveyor General of New Zealand. McKerrow Stream was also known as Champagne Creek.

Source – Map. Information – Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1880s.

Middle Ridge Track Track
Geographical term in that it is the middle of a long and narrow nearby series of ridges.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1900s.

Mound Hill High Point
Geographical term in that it is a rounded area of higher elevation than compared to the surrounding area.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1880s.

Mowlem, Mt High Point
John Mowlem (1840 – 1910) was a 19th century settler in the Moores Valley area.

Source – Map. Information – Land Barons Of Wainuiomata by Gavin Wallace. Time Frame – 1860s.

Nikau Creek Water
A native palm, where the fronds of which meet to form a bulbous head and the unbranched trunk has circular leaf scars.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Orua–Pouanui Headland
Of the place of the den or retreat of Pouanui. O means of. Rua means place. Pouanui is a name of a person. It is also known as Baring Head.

Source – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Time Frame – 1800s.

Pack Track Track
A track that was cut so that supplies could be tracked in.

Source – Our Water History On Tap by John Morrison. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1920s.

Para, Mt High Point
A shortened version of the Māori village or pa called Parangarahu / Parangarehu / Parangarau that existed in Fitzroy Bay.

Source – Map. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Time Frame – 1800s.

Parkway Playground Track Track
A broad landscaped highway thoroughfare. It is also known as Spoon / Spooners Hill Track.

Source – Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1930s.

Plumbago Stream Water
A evergreen flowering shrub or climber plant.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1900s.

Prouses Brow High Point
Prouse, Mt High Point
Richard Prouse (1792 – 1875) was a 19th century settler along the Coast Road.

Source – Map. Information – Land Barons Of Wainuiomata by Gavin Wallace. Time Frame – 1860s.

Pukeatua Bridge High Point
A hill of the god. Puke means hill. Atua means god.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Place Names Dictionary. Time Frame – 2016.

Puketapu, Mt High Point
A sacred hill. Puke means hill. Tapu means sacred.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Place Names Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Puketea, Mt High Point
A tall native tree that has toothed leaves and produces small flowers. It is also known as George, Mt.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Place Names Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Puriri Street Track Track
A large spreading native tree with clusters of red fruit, a popular food of the kereru (native wood pigeon).

Source – Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1960s.

Rata Ridge Track Track
A tall native tree with red flowers similar to those of the pohutukawa.

Source – Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1950s.

Round Hill High Point
Round Peak High Point
Geographical term in that it is higher and circular than the surrounding area.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1880s.

Round Ridge Track Track
Geographical term in that the ridge is round.

Source – A Guide To The Rimutaka Forest by Bill Sewell. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1880s.

Scholes Stream (formerly Scholl Creek) Water
Thomas Scholes (1839 – 1923) was a 19th century settler along the Coast Road. It was changed in 2006 from Scholl Creek.

Source – Map. Information – Our Buried History – Coast Road Church, Wainuiomata by Colleen Hira. Time Frame – 1880s.

Sinclair Creek Water
Hugh Sinclair (1810 – 1871) was a 19th century settler in the Moores Valley / Whitcher Grove area. The family were the owner of a mill in the area.

Source – Map. Information – Land Barons Of Wainuiomata by Gavin Wallace. Time Frame – 1860s.

Skerrets Creek Water
Charles Perrin Skerret (1863 – 1929) was a Chief Justice of New Zealand. He was also a keen outdoors person.

Source – Map. Information – Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1900s.

Skull Gully Stream Water
Named after animal skulls that were found in the area.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1880s.

Sledge Creek Water
Where wooden sledges, pulled by bollocks were used to bring the wood down. It is a historic logging track put in by the Sinclair family in the 19th century.

Source – Map. Information – Greater Wellington Regional Council. Time Frame – 1870s.

Solomon Track Track
A peaceful area. The track was in existence from the 1900s to the 1960s when it was closed as the track was in the Wainuiomata Water Collection area.

Source – Map. Information – Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1900s.

Spoon / Spooners Hill Track Track
An implement consisting of a small, shallow oval or round bowl on a long handle, used for eating, stirring, and serving food. The area is shaped like a spoon so hence its name. It is also known as Parkway Playground Track.

Source – Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1930s.

Stake, Mt High Point
A strong wooden post driven into the ground to mark at boundary.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1960s.

Sugarloaf, Mt High Point
A object or structure with a conical shape.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1880s.

Tawa Track Track
A native tree of the laurel family, which bears damson like fruit.

Source – Wainuiomata Hillroad Reserve Brochure. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1950s.

Te Hikoi Ararewa Track
The pathway to the horizon. Te means the. Hikoi means pathway. Ararewa means horizon.

Source – Newspaper article. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 2018.

Te Raina Pa Settlement
The line. It was a pa site. Te means the. Raina means line.

Source – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Time Frame – 1800s.

Thistle Stream Water
A widely distributed herbaceous plant of the daisy family, which typically has a prickly stem and leaves and rounded heads of purple flowers.

Source – Map. Information – Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1920s.

Totara, Mt High Point
A large native tree that has prickly, olive–green leaves not in two rows.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Towai, Mt High Point
A medium size evergreen native tree that has long, leathery, dark green leaves having blunt teeth. Flowers white to pale rose.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Upper Fitzherbert Track Track
William Fitzherbert (1810 – 1891) represented the Hutt electorate in the 19th century. He also owned substantial parts of land in Wainuiomata.

Source – Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Wikipedia. Time Frame – 2000s.

Wainui, Mt High Point
A big water. It overlooks Wellington harbour. It is also the shorten version of Wainuiomata. Wai means water. Nui means big.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Place Names Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Wainuiomata Personal Name
Wainuiomata Beach Water
Wainuiomata River Water
Wainuiomata River East Branch Water
Wainuiomata River West Branch Water
Wainuiomata Stream Water
Big water or stream of Mata. Wai means water. Nui means big. O means of. Mata refers to a woman's name. This is an official version. The origins of the word are disputed and other commonly accepted translations are:

  • Refers to the women who came over the Wainuiomata Hill to evade marauding tribes who were carrying muskets about 1819 from the north, and who sat wailing by the stream after the slaughter of their menfolk. From this we have “faces streaming with water” or “tears”.
  • Refers to the large pools of water which lay over the swampy surface of the northern end of the Valley, or the river itself which is known to flood the Wainuiomata / Coast Road valley. From this it can also mean large river from the swamp.
  • Mata can also mean flint.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Place Names Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Wainuiomata Iti Stream Water
Small water or stream that feeds in the big water or stream of Mata. See Wainuiomata for the full meaning. Iti means small.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Place Names Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Waiwhetu Range High Point
Starry Water. It is now known as the Wainuiomata Hill. Wai means water. Whetu means stars.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Place Names Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Whare Hill High Point
A hut or house. Named after a hut that was located in the area.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Woods Hill High Point
Wood, Mt High Point
Thomas Woods (1851 – 1938) was a 19th century settler in Wainuiomata.

Source – Map. Information – The Woods Of Woodlands – Wainuiomata by Vicky Alexander. Time Frame – 1880s.

Zigzag Track Track// Geographical term in that the track has alternate right and left turn up and down the hill.

Source – Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1980s.

Bibliography

Maps

  • A Guide To Rimutaka And Haurangi State Forest Parks 274/4 Edition 1 1984.
  • Hutt N160 1943.
  • Hutt N160 3rd Edition 1965.
  • Hutt N160 4th Edition 1977.
  • Lower Hutt BQ32 Edition 1 2017.
  • Onoke N165 3rd Edition 1973.
  • Park Map Rimutaka And Haurangi 274–02 Edition 2 1989.
  • Rimutaka N161 2nd Edition 1968.
  • Rimutaka N161 3rd Edition 1974.
  • Turakirae R28 Edition 1 1978.
  • Wellington BQ31 Edition 2 2016.
  • Wellington N164 2nd Edition 1962.
  • Wellington N164 3rd Edition 1967.
  • Wellington N164 4th Edition 1974.
  • Wellington R27 1st Edition 1979.
  • Wellington R27 and part Q27 2nd Edition 1983.
  • Wellington R27, R28 and part Q27 2006.
  • Wellington R27, R28 and part Q27 3rd Edition 1996.

Surveyor Field Books from Land Information New Zealand.

Other Sources

Birth and Deaths dates have been obtained from:

  • Birth, Death and Marriage Indexes from New Zealand, England and Ireland.
  • Other genealogy sources such as Ancestry and Find My Past.
  • Department of Conservation (DOC) website.
  • Gazette.
  • Greater Wellington Regional Council (GRWC) website.
  • Hutt City Tracks and Trails Brochures.
  • Internet Dictionary.
  • Internet Searches.
  • New Zealand Electoral Rolls from the 1860s to present.
  • Papers Past Website.
  • Petone Settlers Data.
  • Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust.
  • Tararua Tramping Club Trip Reports and Website.
  • Wainuiomata Hillroad Reserve Brochure.
  • Wainuiomata Recreation Area Brochure.
  • Wikipedia.

Books

  • Adkin, G. Leslie. The Great Harbour of Tara.
  • Alexander, Vicky and Hira, Colleen. Wainuiomata Glimpses Of Our Past.
  • Alexander, Vicky. Tales From The Swamp.
  • Alexander, Vicky. The Woods Of Woodlands – Wainuiomata.
  • Alexander, Vicky. Wainuiomata Valley Discovery Trail.
  • Beaglehole, Ann. Eastbourne: A History Of The Eastern Bays.
  • Blayney, G. P. Early Education in Wainuiomata.
  • Cochran, Chris and Maclean, Chris and Sheppard, Allan. Built Heritage of the Orongorongo Valley.
  • Daley, James M. Hutt City Council Centenary 1877 – 1977.
  • Hira, Colleen. Our Buried History – Coast Road Church, Wainuiomata.
  • Kenneally, J. M. and B. M. Wainuiomata These Passing Years.
  • Kerr, Ross. A Chronology of the Tararua and Rimutaka Ranges – 6th Edition.
  • Lane–Taylor, Joanne. The History of the Orongoronga Valley and Environs.
  • Morrison, John. Our Water History On Tap.
  • Reed, A.W. A Dictionary of Maori Place Names.
  • Sewell, Bill. A Guide to Rimutaka Forest Park.
  • Wallace, Gavin and Chambers, Dawn. Tales From Wainuiomata Past Volume 2.
  • Wallace, Gavin. The Land Barons Of Wainuiomata.
  • Wallace, Gavin (compiled). Tales From Wainuiomata Past.
Category
Wainuiomata Glossary

Page last modified on 2020 Jan 12 07:05

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